/page/2

Shadowboxx really opens up to the landscape.  The cut-aways to different natural environments build a strong association between the build environment and the natural world.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Symposium - Landscape Infrastructure : systems & strategies for contemporary urbanization

This past weekend, March 23-24, I attended the Landscape Infrastructure symposium at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design.  This symposium, organized by Pierre Belanger, pulled together a broad range of professionals to present and participate in discussions about the past and present way we look at infrastructure.

Belanger kicked off the symposium by pointing out that, as landscape architects, we are greatly outnumbered by Civil Engineers and we should examine and question how the field of engineering operates—are there techniques we can learn from, or ways to re-contextualize the economic models of engineering.  The United States Army Corps of Engineers motto, Essayons, which translates to, ‘Let us Try,’ appears to be a motto that only operates functionally, and doesn’t address issues of maintenance, devising contingency plans, or ecology.

Organized around three panel discussions, the day proved to be an inspiring one.  This is the first symposium where I was allowed to contemplate perspectives from all the parties involved when we design and build infrastructure, making notes of new ideas, or ways to frame information and make sound design decisions based on their ideas.  I was refreshed that each speaker brought their perspective to the conversation with a hope of generating new avenues for collaboration, not a presentation by a dictatorial designer, only there to boast about their award winning projects.

A breakdown of each panel will be posted later.

http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/events/landscape-infrastructure.html

Crowd is filling in this morning at the Landscape Infrastructure symposium at the GSD.

Last nights keynote speaker, Rosalind Williams, opened up with an interesting take on infrastructure through the lens of the writings of Robert Louis Stevenson.

Crowd is filling in this morning at the Landscape Infrastructure symposium at the GSD.

Last nights keynote speaker, Rosalind Williams, opened up with an interesting take on infrastructure through the lens of the writings of Robert Louis Stevenson.

The following is the abstract from my RISD Master of Landscape Architecture Thesis where I set out to design a protest route through Providence.  Presently with Occupy Wall Street and other Occupy events going on world wide I needed to dig this up.  It is a very surreal experience to see Occupy Providence beginning and events unfold that are captured in my thesis work.  Perhaps my mappings can be of use.

My thesis book can be found at the RISD library, or I can be contacted for the pdf. http://tinyurl.com/3lh5h8g

Abstract:

In our post-9/11 culture public space has been transformed.  “Open spaces have become either suspect urban no-man’s lands or bleak accommodations to street setback requirements, bristling with barriers and cameras that anticipate visiting trucks packed with C4 explosives, not bubbly tourists packed with cameras and guide books (Hockenberry p 78).”  As people retreat to the safety to their suburbs, gated communities, and private properties the once lively urban streets and urban plazas have been forsaken.  Urban streets and plazas have symbolically been the main stage sets for people gathering to connect, recharge, and engage in democracy and the public sphere; a stage used to amplify the voice of the people.  Our current hyper-security state threatens ones First Amendment Rights which states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances (American Memory).”  I highly value our First Amendment Rights, especially being a designer, artist and filmmaker.  This thesis aims to subversively design new civic spaces which unfold through the act of walking.  The use of subversive design can create adaptive elements to meet the needs of the state for civic celebration and to meet the needs of individuals and groups to speak out.  My concerns and questions will be investigated and answered through case studies and a design proposal for the city of Providence, RI.  My methodology, cinematic fantasy, will use cinematic techniques such as narrative, sequencing and montage in order to capture walking as protest.

Landscape + Architecture = ? ? ?

The following posts are my notes and examples I used for a Architecture Design Forum presentation I gave at my office on July 13, 2011.  The purpose of the forum is to spark lively cross studio debate and discussion, with the hopes of leaving the audience with a different design perspective.

The generation of the presentation came about because I work in an Architecture firm, and well, our conversations tend to center more around architecture.  From these conversations I felt I was continually wondering about a cluster of the same questions:

Is landscape an extension of the building?  Or is the building an extension of the landscape?

Is it important that a landscape acknowledge the site?  If so, is the acknowledgement metaphor or ecology?

Is landscape a work of art.  Or is landscape artful inhabitation?

Does sustainable mean natural?  When is natural not sustainable?

If we look at the questions all together, I feel they start to open up a discussion on how one could approach designing landscape architecture, or develop a design methodology.

Is landscape an extension of the building? Or is the building an extension of the landscape?

These two projects work in opposite ways but have boiled down landscape to just a landform.  Which I feel landscape is more than just making landforms.  The Lycee Jean Moulin campus uses a land development strategy that has been used throughout history, but limits the forms that a classroom could take, making all programs equal.

And if the Beckton Campus really wanted to preserve the ‘great lawn’ why not keep it a flat lawn and design a freestanding on grade building as the connector instead of forcing people up on a roof.  They have taken the once great lawn and reduced it to two little areas.

Beckton Dickinson Campus Center — Landscape an extension of Building

Lycee Jean Moulin — Building an extension of Landscape

Landscape extension of the building

Beckton Dickinson Campus Center, Franklin Lakes, NJ

Architect & Landscape Architect:  RMJM

Medical Technology Company Campus

2 existing buildings built in the late 80’s and early 90’s on a cleared, flat site,

campus center is the ‘bridge’ between the two in order to preserve the ‘great lawn’ space in between.

Lycee Jean Moulin Campus, Revin, France

Architect:  Off Architecture

Landscape Architect:  Scape Architecture

Campus is integrated into the existing site conditions

Is it important that a landscape acknowledge the site? If so, is the acknowledgement metaphor or ecology?

Site acknowledgment is a great way to make one project clearly rooted in it’s local context.  If you had two identical buildings, one in Ohio and one in Colorado, and they both were flat and lawn covered, how would you know which is which?

So the Texas example used the character of the ranching planes as a metaphor where children can gather under the ‘story tree.’  However, the story tree is all the way over here, while the hospital has turned it’s back on the tree and has oriented the entry around a sea of parking.  If the metaphor was so important, it should be readily apparent in the design. 

The AZ cancer center really shines as an example of recognizing the site.  This center would be appalling if it was planted with stretches of water intensive lawns, disconnecting patients from the beauty of the desert.  Some people might think that it looks unkempt and weedy, but what I see is a very talented set of designers that know their native plants so well that they can compose a project that fits right into the desert.

Children’s Medical Center Legacy — Site as Metaphor

University of Arizona Cancer Center — Site as Ecology



Children’s Medical Center Legacy, Plano, TX

Architect: ZGF with Page Southerland Page

Landscape Architect:  Newman, Jackson, Bieberstein

Existing ranching site where families gathered under a live oak tree to tell stories and enjoy respite from the Texas heat.

Masterplan revolved around Saving 100-year-old oak ‘story tree’.

Shadowboxx really opens up to the landscape.  The cut-aways to different natural environments build a strong association between the build environment and the natural world.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Symposium - Landscape Infrastructure : systems & strategies for contemporary urbanization

This past weekend, March 23-24, I attended the Landscape Infrastructure symposium at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design.  This symposium, organized by Pierre Belanger, pulled together a broad range of professionals to present and participate in discussions about the past and present way we look at infrastructure.

Belanger kicked off the symposium by pointing out that, as landscape architects, we are greatly outnumbered by Civil Engineers and we should examine and question how the field of engineering operates—are there techniques we can learn from, or ways to re-contextualize the economic models of engineering.  The United States Army Corps of Engineers motto, Essayons, which translates to, ‘Let us Try,’ appears to be a motto that only operates functionally, and doesn’t address issues of maintenance, devising contingency plans, or ecology.

Organized around three panel discussions, the day proved to be an inspiring one.  This is the first symposium where I was allowed to contemplate perspectives from all the parties involved when we design and build infrastructure, making notes of new ideas, or ways to frame information and make sound design decisions based on their ideas.  I was refreshed that each speaker brought their perspective to the conversation with a hope of generating new avenues for collaboration, not a presentation by a dictatorial designer, only there to boast about their award winning projects.

A breakdown of each panel will be posted later.

http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/events/landscape-infrastructure.html

Crowd is filling in this morning at the Landscape Infrastructure symposium at the GSD.

Last nights keynote speaker, Rosalind Williams, opened up with an interesting take on infrastructure through the lens of the writings of Robert Louis Stevenson.

Crowd is filling in this morning at the Landscape Infrastructure symposium at the GSD.

Last nights keynote speaker, Rosalind Williams, opened up with an interesting take on infrastructure through the lens of the writings of Robert Louis Stevenson.

The following is the abstract from my RISD Master of Landscape Architecture Thesis where I set out to design a protest route through Providence.  Presently with Occupy Wall Street and other Occupy events going on world wide I needed to dig this up.  It is a very surreal experience to see Occupy Providence beginning and events unfold that are captured in my thesis work.  Perhaps my mappings can be of use.

My thesis book can be found at the RISD library, or I can be contacted for the pdf. http://tinyurl.com/3lh5h8g

Abstract:

In our post-9/11 culture public space has been transformed.  “Open spaces have become either suspect urban no-man’s lands or bleak accommodations to street setback requirements, bristling with barriers and cameras that anticipate visiting trucks packed with C4 explosives, not bubbly tourists packed with cameras and guide books (Hockenberry p 78).”  As people retreat to the safety to their suburbs, gated communities, and private properties the once lively urban streets and urban plazas have been forsaken.  Urban streets and plazas have symbolically been the main stage sets for people gathering to connect, recharge, and engage in democracy and the public sphere; a stage used to amplify the voice of the people.  Our current hyper-security state threatens ones First Amendment Rights which states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances (American Memory).”  I highly value our First Amendment Rights, especially being a designer, artist and filmmaker.  This thesis aims to subversively design new civic spaces which unfold through the act of walking.  The use of subversive design can create adaptive elements to meet the needs of the state for civic celebration and to meet the needs of individuals and groups to speak out.  My concerns and questions will be investigated and answered through case studies and a design proposal for the city of Providence, RI.  My methodology, cinematic fantasy, will use cinematic techniques such as narrative, sequencing and montage in order to capture walking as protest.

Landscape + Architecture = ? ? ?

The following posts are my notes and examples I used for a Architecture Design Forum presentation I gave at my office on July 13, 2011.  The purpose of the forum is to spark lively cross studio debate and discussion, with the hopes of leaving the audience with a different design perspective.

The generation of the presentation came about because I work in an Architecture firm, and well, our conversations tend to center more around architecture.  From these conversations I felt I was continually wondering about a cluster of the same questions:

Is landscape an extension of the building?  Or is the building an extension of the landscape?

Is it important that a landscape acknowledge the site?  If so, is the acknowledgement metaphor or ecology?

Is landscape a work of art.  Or is landscape artful inhabitation?

Does sustainable mean natural?  When is natural not sustainable?

If we look at the questions all together, I feel they start to open up a discussion on how one could approach designing landscape architecture, or develop a design methodology.

Is landscape an extension of the building? Or is the building an extension of the landscape?

These two projects work in opposite ways but have boiled down landscape to just a landform.  Which I feel landscape is more than just making landforms.  The Lycee Jean Moulin campus uses a land development strategy that has been used throughout history, but limits the forms that a classroom could take, making all programs equal.

And if the Beckton Campus really wanted to preserve the ‘great lawn’ why not keep it a flat lawn and design a freestanding on grade building as the connector instead of forcing people up on a roof.  They have taken the once great lawn and reduced it to two little areas.

Beckton Dickinson Campus Center — Landscape an extension of Building

Lycee Jean Moulin — Building an extension of Landscape

Landscape extension of the building

Beckton Dickinson Campus Center, Franklin Lakes, NJ

Architect & Landscape Architect:  RMJM

Medical Technology Company Campus

2 existing buildings built in the late 80’s and early 90’s on a cleared, flat site,

campus center is the ‘bridge’ between the two in order to preserve the ‘great lawn’ space in between.

Lycee Jean Moulin Campus, Revin, France

Architect:  Off Architecture

Landscape Architect:  Scape Architecture

Campus is integrated into the existing site conditions

Is it important that a landscape acknowledge the site? If so, is the acknowledgement metaphor or ecology?

Site acknowledgment is a great way to make one project clearly rooted in it’s local context.  If you had two identical buildings, one in Ohio and one in Colorado, and they both were flat and lawn covered, how would you know which is which?

So the Texas example used the character of the ranching planes as a metaphor where children can gather under the ‘story tree.’  However, the story tree is all the way over here, while the hospital has turned it’s back on the tree and has oriented the entry around a sea of parking.  If the metaphor was so important, it should be readily apparent in the design. 

The AZ cancer center really shines as an example of recognizing the site.  This center would be appalling if it was planted with stretches of water intensive lawns, disconnecting patients from the beauty of the desert.  Some people might think that it looks unkempt and weedy, but what I see is a very talented set of designers that know their native plants so well that they can compose a project that fits right into the desert.

Children’s Medical Center Legacy — Site as Metaphor

University of Arizona Cancer Center — Site as Ecology



Children’s Medical Center Legacy, Plano, TX

Architect: ZGF with Page Southerland Page

Landscape Architect:  Newman, Jackson, Bieberstein

Existing ranching site where families gathered under a live oak tree to tell stories and enjoy respite from the Texas heat.

Masterplan revolved around Saving 100-year-old oak ‘story tree’.

Symposium - Landscape Infrastructure : systems & strategies for contemporary urbanization
Landscape + Architecture = ? ? ?
Is landscape an extension of the building? Or is the building an extension of the landscape?
Is it important that a landscape acknowledge the site? If so, is the acknowledgement metaphor or ecology?

About:

Current Landscape Architect's exploration on profession's state of affairs

Following: